Heartwork Is…

Heartwork is a synthesis of Eastern meditative approaches to healing and Western psychotherapeutic techniques, using awareness as the primary vehicle to see into the source of one’s problems. 

 

      The basic assumption of Heartwork is that our fundamental state is wholeness.  Dis-ease is a separation from this wholeness. 

 

      “Problems” are symptoms of underlying conflicts, caused by running away from, or fighting against, certain aspects of oneself.  The tensions created by this internal split may manifest themselves as “dis-ease” in one or more of the interpenetrating aspects of our being: physical, emotional, mental, and/or spiritual.  In any case, these tensions are held in very specific places in the body/mind.

 

      The “solution,” then, is simply to stop running, and to look directly into the heart of the “problem” by: quieting the mind, clearly defining the “problem,” focusing the attention into the feeling space or area of the body where the conflict is centered, and then looking into the very center of this area to find the “solution.” 

 

      As one looks more and more deeply into one’s experience of the “problem,” one becomes increasingly aware of the underlying mental, emotional, and spiritual roots of one’s issue.  By allowing oneself to be completely with these split-off parts of oneself, there is a “coming together” (“wholing”) within oneself, in which the dis-ease producing thought/feeling is released, and the “problem” resolved.

 

      From this place of peace, one is then able to see clearly how one has moved away from one’s state of wholeness to create the “problem” one has just resolved.  Understanding, forgiveness and compassion flow freely from this insight, and healing (though not necessarily “curing” on a physical level) occurs naturally out of this inner ease.  Awarenesses are then integrated into one’s actions, so that one can live more harmoniously with others and the world.

 

      The Heartwork process teaches one to use the “problems” of one’s life as a kind of doorway into a space of open awareness and insight, rather than giving problems the power to run one’s life.  As a result, one is continually learning from one’s experience, and life becomes “The Great Adventure.”